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Managing stress and anxiety during COVID-19

Managing Stress and Anxiety during COVID-19

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“Taking care of yourself is the most powerful way to begin to take care of others.”
― Bryant McGill

During this challenging time and rapidly changing situation with COVID-19, we want you to know that myHealth For Teens & Young Adults is here for you. Changes in our routine, lack of control, and fear of the unknown can cause our mental health to suffer. Prioritizing self-care during this stressful time is important. It can be big or small, something you do by yourself, as a family- or both! Finding things that bring you joy like reading, cuddling with pets, going on a (safe) walk through your community are just a few ways we can take care of our mental health.

We might not have control of what is happening, but we do have a choice on how we handle it. Below are different techniques, resources and ideas to inspire you to take time for yourself, which can improve your mood and help you react calm when faced with stress or challenges.

Need a reminder? Follow myHealth at @myHealthMN on Instagram and Facebook. We will be sharing tips, leading meditations and more!

 

Self-Care

“Self-care is giving the world the best of you, instead of what’s left of you.”
— Katie Reed

If we don’t take care of ourselves how can we take care of others? Self-care is when we take an active role in protecting our well-being and happiness, especially during times of stress. There are many ways to practice self-care- staying nourished, limiting media intake, regular exercise or movement and connecting with others are just a few examples. Paying attention to what we need and practicing self-care is not selfish, it can make us more resilient and help us better care for others.

How are you practicing self-care?  Take this quiz from one of our favorite resources, LoveIsRespect, to check-in with yourself and see how you’re doing.

 

Meditation

Meditation is often described as focusing your mind for a period of time to think deeply. Meditation is practiced in many cultures all over the world. There are different techniques so it is important to be patient and find one that works for you. Below are a few resources to help you get started!

Guided Meditation:

A narrator leads the meditation, many times directing the person listening to connect with their body, breathing or imagine calming scenes.

Apps: Headspace and Calm are popular with free trials or free aspects. Take a look on your app store there may be others you enjoy- there are many that are friendly for meditators of all ages!

Videos and Audio:

https://www.mindful.org/
https://www.changetochill.org/activities-tools/

Unguided Meditation:

This type of meditation is focused on sitting quietly and paying attention to thoughts and sensations throughout the body for a set period of time.

Check out Headspace’s guide on how to get started.

 

Mindfulness

Mindfulness is the ability to be fully present in the moment. There are many ways to practice mindfulness and build this skill so we are able to step back and be in the present moment in any situation. Just like anything, it takes practice to build this skill.  Meditation, reading, drawing, going for a walk, anything that allows you to focus on the present moment.

Add Mindfulness to your daily activities:

Mindful Walking– Taking a walk (following safe, CDC recommended practices) can be great for mental and physical health! On your next walk practice mindfulness.
Mindful Eating– During your next meal, take some time to be aware of your body’s sensations while you eat.

 

Grounding Exercises

Sometimes we get overwhelmed and need some help focusing. Grounding exercises are a great way to refocus on the present and surroundings.

Try this countdown exercise when feeling overwhelmed:

Without moving notice your surroundings…

5 things you see

4 things you feel

3 things you hear

2 things you smell

1 thing you taste

 

Affirmations

We are all important and wonderful humans doing the best we can in a tough situation. Affirmations and mantras are a way we can show self-love. A person can speak these, write them down and read them daily.

Creating an affirmation can be easy. Start with the phrase “I am” and fill in a word you need – think about what is happening in your life and where you might want support. For example, “I am strong and resilient. I am resourceful.”

Need a little more help with managing the Coronavirus pandemic? Check out our past blog post on a self-compassion exercise.

We are in this together, and help is always available.  If you’re feeling alone and struggling, you can also reach out to The Crisis Text Line by texting TALK to 741741 or calling National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK.

Be well.

 

 

Happy Holidays

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The holiday season can be an exciting and cheerful time and it can also introduce a variety of stressors when it comes to family. Here at myHealth, we talk to young people about how to have healthy romantic relationships and it’s important to acknowledge that maintaining healthy familial relationships can be just as challenging to navigate. Often when we talk about family, we approach those relationships with an “it is what it is” attitude. It can be easy to feel powerless when it comes to relationships with our family, and that can make “mandatory” holiday events feel stressful. Learning how to set boundaries can drastically improve the quality of these relationships and allow us to leave the holiday season feeling more relaxed and less agitated.

To be able to set these clear boundaries, it’s important to first understand what you want to get out of the holiday season. Is it important to see every relative? What about holiday traditions? Which ones are a must and which ones would you be okay skipping this year? Identify the specific characteristics of the activities you like and the ones that cause you stress. Love not having to leave the house because the whole family comes over but hate getting stuck in the kitchen all day? Tell your family you’re excited to host but that dinner will be a potluck this year. Love the cookie decorating contest at your aunt’s house but hate that she always makes a comment about how many cookies you eat? Decide to do a smaller cookie party for just your immediate family or come prepared to say, “actually, Aunt Deborah, thanks for your concern but I don’t want to talk about my weight” and change the subject. Setting boundaries with family can be really hard, but thinking ahead of time about what you want to get out of the holiday season can allow you to approach gatherings with a renewed spirit. 

Navigating the events can introduce a whole new set of challenges. Practicing healthy self-care through these gatherings is essential for feeling our best through the season. Here are some suggestions for subtle self-care during a family event:

  • Offer to be the person to run to the grocery store if you run out of an ingredient (and do an extra lap down the aisles for some more alone time)
  • Offer to take the dog for a walk
  • Organize an activity to do with the kids if certain family members are getting on your nerves
  • Escape to the bathroom and do a 5-minute meditation
  • If alcohol affects you negatively, choose not to drink, or to drink less during these stressful events
  • Plan an event (real or made up) that starts right after the family gathering so you have an excuse to leave the gathering on time
  • Come up with short and concrete responses ahead of time for unwanted questions you know you might get from family members
  • Practice saying “I’d prefer not to talk about that”
  • Give yourself permission to get up and leave the table (or the event!) if you need to

After a family event, be sure to plan a day of rest for yourself where you can relax and recuperate. You could write affirmations in a journal, do activities that make you feel good or ask a friend to text you some nice compliments for you to look at if you’re feeling down. Whatever you do, it’s important to be gentle with yourself and give yourself time to recharge. 

You may also decide that family gatherings are not in your best interest this year. It is okay for us to set boundaries that prevent us from having to be around relationships that are unhealthy for us. In these times, finding a chosen family can be an empowering way to fill that void. Look for friends that support and uplift you in the way you desire and set aside time to celebrate the holiday season with them. Whether it is a dinner, a party, an afternoon watching your favorite movie together, or a simple exchanging of cards, celebrating the important people in our lives during the holiday season can help us feel valued and loved in a season that can be hard for many of us. 

Happy holidays, and remember- if you feel like you need to talk, or need more tools, we’re here and ready to listen.

 – Emily M

 

Self-compassion exercise

How Would You Treat a Friend?

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We can all be a little too hard on ourselves. Check out this self-compassion exercise our therapist Jill created to practice shifting our perspective and be more kind to ourselves. Need more exercises like this? We currently are accepting new clients and do not have a waitlist. So if you feel like you need to talk, we’re here and ready to listen.

There is no doubt about it, life can be really hard sometimes and as human beings we all make mistakes. A lot of us become self-critical, feel ashamed and try to fix ourselves when something goes wrong. How do you treat yourself when things fall apart? We often are the hardest on ourselves. If you find yourself beating yourself up about what goes wrong in your life try to the exercise below.

How to Do It:

Take out a sheet of paper or open a blank document on your computer and go through the following steps.

  1. First, think about times when a close friend feels really bad about him- or herself or is really struggling in some way. How do you respond to your friend in these situations (when you’re at your best)? Please write down what you typically do and say, and note the tone in which you talk to your friend.
  1. Now think about times when you feel bad about yourself or are struggling. How do you typically respond to yourself in these situations? Please write down what you typically do and say, and note the tone in which you talk to yourself.
  1. Did you notice a difference? If so, ask yourself why. What factors or fears come into play that leads you to treat yourself and others so differently?
  1. Write down how you think things might change if you responded to yourself when you’re suffering in the same way you typically respond to a close friend.
  1. Next time you are struggling with something, try treating yourself like a good friend and see what happens.

 

 

My stance on drugs - a personal story of a college woman and her older brother struggling with drug abuse

“My Stance on Drugs”

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Drug use has admittedly not been an issue at the forefront of my mind through most of the high school. That’s not to say drugs haven’t been around, because of course, they have. Most people I know have experimented at least a little bit. Drugs have always been a part of the high school experience, from what I’ve seen. It’s never seemed like much of a problem, so long as it’s been limited to alcohol and weed, and even nicotine, although that one is a bit sadder. It’s human nature to want to try new things, but if a person wants to avoid drugs in high school it’s entirely possible. Nobody is going to force you to try their drugs, it’s a waste of money. My stance has always been that as long as people aren’t messing with anything too physically addictive, all is well. 

My stance shifted in March, after a college visit. I had a break between classes at the University of Minnesota when by chance I ran into my older brother, a couple of days into a hellish, week-long acid trip. I didn’t know exactly what was going on because he wasn’t making enough sense to tell me, but obviously, something was wrong, and so I dropped everything to try to keep him safe. Everything about the situation was shocking, because it was my brother, and because he’d always seemed so happy and healthy and not at all psychotic. Nobody tells you what to do in situations like these, and I wasn’t at all prepared to deal with it alone. I called my mom, and the police, and we got him to the mental health clinic on campus, and then into an ambulance, and to the hospital. We spent most of the day in waiting rooms. The doctor sent him home almost immediately, even though he obviously shouldn’t have. Everyone was too scared to make any noise in our house. I was too scared to be at home at all. After a few days, we got him back into the hospital, where he stayed for the remainder of the week. It was terrifying to watch him put himself through hell, without knowing when, or if, it was going to end. He’s doing much better now, but March was a bad month for my family, and it was especially awful for him.

The thing about my brother was that he never tried any seriously addictive drugs. He was making his fair share of questionable decisions, but none of them was the kind I would have taken too seriously before March. I got a bit more touchy about drug use when I realized anything could happen to anyone. Trauma does that to a person. Fundamentally, my views haven’t changed much, but my experience made me realize that there are some major issues when it comes to awareness and communication surrounding drug use. 

It’s unrealistic to tell kids to never use drugs. They’re going to do what they want, and if that’s to smoke weed and drink with their friends, so be it. Telling young people that they shouldn’t use drugs is about as effective as telling them not to have sex. Drugs aren’t going anywhere. Even when it looks like a common drug is dying out, companies specifically target young people with new iterations of the same thing, as we’ve seen with the fall of cigarettes and the rise of vaping. It’s not great, but it’s the truth. 

Instead of telling kids that drugs are bad and leaving it at that, even if they are, parents should try to aim for open communication. Most parents have probably at least dabbled before, and hiding that from their kids doesn’t actually do any good. It’s more hypocritical than anything. Similarly, freaking out when you find your kid’s weed isn’t going to make them stop smoking, it’ll just make them more paranoid about being caught again. I think that the best thing a parent can do is to make drugs seem less taboo by being open about them. Obviously encouraging drug use is a bad idea, but teaching kids to be safer in their usage is within reason. If people are being honest about what they’re doing, the chances of things getting out of hand are a lot slimmer. 

Parents should be a resource their kids can turn to if they need help, which means they need to come from a place of understanding. People should be taught that addiction is a health problem and not a moral shortcoming and that they have support systems in place, even if hopefully, they will never have to rely on them. They should be taught that a drug doesn’t have to be a scary, hard drug to be a problem. People should also have information available about the risks of drug use, and not just the “if you use drugs, you will die” type of information. It should be clear to people what they are getting into, and that they can get help for their drug use before it’s an emergency if they ever need it, and not get in trouble for it.

It’s never too soon for parents to start talking to their kids about drug use. It may not be fun or comfortable, but I would hope that the safety and competence that comes from an open dialogue is enough to outweigh the discomfort of talking about drugs with your kids. If you work at it enough, it should stop feeling awkward after a while. And to any young people reading, the chances are that your parents are more understanding and supportive than you think they are. Whether you need them or not, please trust that they are there for you.

Know that there are plenty of other resources to turn to when it comes to drug-related problems. Don’t be afraid to come to MyHealth with any questions you might have. In case of a more serious issue, here are some helplines:

24/7 National Drug Use/Addiction Hotline: 1-888-633-3239

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) National Helpline: 1-800-662-HELP

Lastly, if you are ever in a drug-related emergency and someone may be in need of medical assistance, don’t hesitate to call 911. Remember, it’s not illegal to do drugs, it’s only illegal to have them. Your safety is the top priority. 

 

Summer Newsletter

Summer Newsletter

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We hope everyone is enjoying their summer! Here is what one of our awesome Youth Advisory Board (YAB) members has to say about summer, stress, and taking the time to communicate and connect with the young people in your life. 

Students start counting down the days till summer immediately after getting home from their first day of school. Every day that passes is one step closer to teens’ favorite time of the year. The spring months of warm (well, warmer) days and swirling pollen peak teens’ excitement as they begin to plan for days lakeside tanning or snuggled up under blankets with their friends at a drive-in movie. Once summer hits, a feeling of total freedom saturates the air as teens run out of their schools and into the world. 

For some teens, their summers maybe day after day in a boat at their favorite lake. Others may be working at jobs. Regardless, mixed in with the freedoms of summer is a lot more time to yourself. This means more time to contemplate common stressors many teens carry, such as insecurity or family conflicts. A common misconception many teens and adults have alike is that mental illness will magically disappear once summer starts. Although there may not be daily tests or terrifying teachers to worry about, summer comes with its own bundle of stressors. For starters, academics continue into summer for most teens, specifically those who are preparing for the ACT/ SAT or have summer homework to complete for the following school year. Also, many teens are attending their senior friends’ graduation parties, saying goodbye to their college-bound classmates, and beginning to think about what they want to do once they graduate. These stressful thoughts can also come from social media. In my experience, one of the lowest points in my summer is always when I begin to compare my day spent in my room on my laptop to my friend’s day truffle hunting in Italy that she documented on her Insta-story.

To deal with all the pressure and stress summer gives teens the time to think about, some may turn to unhealthy forms of coping. The spike in substance abuse for teens in the summer is no coincidence, as many turns to drugs and alcohol to mask their emotions. Others may find themselves in abusive relationships with friends or significant others as a way of dealing with their feelings. 

With all of these issues that teens may be facing in the summer, it is important for parents to encourage healthy habits throughout the summer months. For example, it may sometimes be hard to find time to spend with the family during the school year, so summer is the perfect time to put more effort into meaningful communication with teens. Talk to teens about how they’re feeling. Just because school isn’t in session for most kids, doesn’t mean that everything is perfect in their lives. Encouraging, but not forcing, teens to work on themselves or their skills over summer can also be helpful. This could be anything from getting a summer job to taking an art class to bake more at home. Another plus to encouraging teens to find activities to keep them busy over the summer is the opportunity for parents to get involved and spend even more time with their teens. Although, as a high school students myself, I feel like I have to mention that it is important to realize that all people have their own limits which should be acknowledged.

Summer may be seen as the season of infinite possibilities and new experiences for teens, but it is important to make sure that you’re spending it the way that you want to. Just because you see the kid who sat next to you in Algebra class posting every day about being out on the lake or hiking up a mountain doesn’t mean that your days of reading a book on your porch or sketching out your favorite superhero while watching movies in your basement are a waste of time. Everyone has their own interests, goals, and dreams of how they want their life to play out. It is important to find your own visions of your ideal life and future, and then work towards that vision. 

To me, as well as most teens, the absolute best part of summer is the time given to self reflect and decide what you want to do with the time that you have for the next few months. Some may decide to go on daily runs to prepare for their next season of sports, and others may decide to start journaling in order to cope with their mental illness. Although trying to improve yourself and your life can at times be stressful or even scary, it is important to remember to use the time you have to find what makes you happiest and healthiest and strive towards that.  

Interested in joining YAB for the 2019-2020 school year?

The myHealth Youth Advisory Board (YAB) is made up of a diverse group of young people ages 15-19 who represent myHealth in their schools and communities and are interested in teen health and leadership opportunities. YAB members give vital input and feedback on the programs and clinic at myHealth, are trained to provide education to classmates, friends, and peers, represent myHealth at community events, help raise awareness and funds for myHealth and volunteer within the local community.

Applications are accepted year-round, but interviews for admission into YAB occurs only once per year, in the summer. If you or a young person you know would like to apply or just have some questions, contact Laura Herman at [email protected]

Happy Pride Month!

Happy Pride

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Happy Pride! Check out what Lane, one of our awesome Youth Advisory Board (YAB) members, has to say about Pride and what it means to them.

June, or “Pride Month”, is a time for celebration. It’s a time to recognize all people of all genders and sexualities across the country and across the world. It is a time to remember those who fought for our rights and made it possible to have the freedom we do now. It is also a time to see how much progress we still have to make. For all the LGBTQIA+ people across the globe, it’s mainly a time for us to be loud and proud of who we are.

It’s not always safe for LGBTQIA+ kids to be open in public places, so the festival gives them a chance to feel secure and unguarded about themselves. The month’s festivities and bright colors give a bold identity to a proud community that has prospered even in the face of adversity.

This, to me, means that I can be strong and bold, regardless of what people think of me at school, in my family, or even what random strangers may think of me. It gives me the courage to be myself and provides a community of support for other people like me. I was raised in a Catholic family, went to Catholic schools my whole life, and never knew many LGBTQIA+ people until I was older. I felt like I was all alone, but after my first pride month, I gained friends who really knew and understood me. They made me realize that I wasn’t alone, and that being myself was okay. The most freeing lesson I’ve learned is how to be genuinely me. One thing I wish everyone knew is how to support young LGBTQIA+ people, especially adults. It’s hard for young kids to ask adults for the things they need, especially when the driving force behind the needs is something as personal as their identity. There are a few simple things adults can do to help young LGBTQIA+ kids feel more comfortable expressing themselves.

  1. Introduce yourself with your pronouns. Walking up to someone and being upfront about your own identity will help them be more comfortable talking about theirs. For example, when I introduce myself, I make sure to say, “I use he/him/his or they/them/their pronouns.”
  2. Do research on gender-neutral pronouns that you haven’t heard about before. There are pronouns used less commonly like ze/zir and ey/em that many non-binary people use. Knowing how to use these comfortably helps people feel accepted.
  3. Use gender-neutral terms in conversation. Rather than saying “boyfriend” or “girlfriend”, use terms like “partner” or “significant other”. This can work for siblings, parents, and spouses as well.
  4. Celebrate pride month with us! Even if you aren’t LGBTQIA+, showing your support for the community can go a long way. Grab that rainbow flag and wave it along with us! Help young kids and LGBTQIA+ teenagers and adults to be loud and proud by being accepting and proud of yourself. Whatever is going on in the world around you or in your community, choose love.
10 ways to reduce stress during finals

10 ways to reduce stress during finals

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10 Ways to Reduce Stress During Finals

Stress is something we all experience at different points in our life. How we deal with stress can impact our mood, our self-esteem, and even our health. The end of the school year can be a stressful time for most folks. There are many things on the minds of young people like finals, prom, finding a summer job, and graduation just to name a few. It is important during stressful times we pause to take care of ourselves. myHealth’s Youth Advisory Board put together this list of stress relieving techniques a person can incorporate into their day. Coping strategies do not solve the problem or stressor, but they do calm us down and re-center our focus so we can better face our stress.

Interested in joining YAB for the 2019-2020 school year?

The myHealth Youth Advisory Board (YAB) is made up of a diverse group of young people ages 15-19 who represent myHealth in their schools and communities and are interested in teen health and leadership opportunities. YAB members give vital input and feedback on the programs and clinic at myHealth, are trained to provide education to classmates, friends, and peers, represent myHealth at community events, help raise awareness and funds for myHealth and volunteer within the local community.

Applications are accepted year-round, but interviews for admission into YAB occurs only once per year, in the summer. If you or a young person you know would like to apply or just have some questions, contact Laura Herman at [email protected].

 

April is STI Awareness Month

April is Sexually Transmitted Infection Awareness Month!

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Alarming STI Statistics Just Released in Minnesota

Adolescents and young adults experience a disproportionately high rate of sexually transmitted infections. In 2017, adolescents ages 15-19 only accounted for 7% of the Minnesota population but accounted for 25% of all chlamydia and 18% of all gonorrhea cases.1 It is important to talk with young people about STIs and empower them to make responsible and well-informed decisions.

You have probably heard before adolescents have a sense of being invincible, and tend to have an “it will never happen to me” mind-set. This mind-set applies to STIs just as it does to driving fast. Many people don’t think they will ever contract an STI but statistics tell a different story. Talking to young people about STIs can empower them to prevent the spread of STIs, but also lets them know what they can do if they have been infected.

Talking about STIs doesn’t encourage young people to be sexually active, but it does take away the stigma of reproductive health. This stigma prevents young people from talking about STIs with partners, getting tested, and taking care of their health. When we ask young people what might prevent someone from talking about STIs with a partner, the top answers we hear are awkwardness and embarrassment. We want young people to know it’s okay to feel awkward, but there is nothing embarrassing about taking care of their health. But how do we let young people know that? Having conversations of our own.

Talking with our young people about sexuality can seem intimidating. You might feel like you don’t have all the information, don’t know the right time to bring it up, or fear young people will laugh it off or respond with an eye roll. It’s okay to feel this way! Parents don’t have to be experts to be great sexuality educators in their young people’s lives. The most important thing is to be open and available whenever your young person wants to talk.

Not sure how to start talking to your young person about STIs? We have a few tips:

  • Reassure young people that they are normal- as are their questions and thoughts.
  • Ask questions (even if they don’t)! Ask them about what they think, what they know, and what they may want to know about STIs and reproductive health.
  • Make it feel like a normal, everyday conversation, like you’re talking about what groceries you need from the store. This also helps reduce the stigma that exists around STIs and taking care of your reproductive health.
  • Leave a journal article or brochure about STIs out for your young person to see- curiosity almost always prevails. Follow up with a conversation! 
  • Share some of the rumors you heard about STIs when you were in high school and the correct information you know now.
  • Discuss that at times your teen may feel more comfortable talking with someone other than you. Together, think of other trusted adults with whom they can talk with, or resources they can access (like myHealth!).

 

Been a while since your last health class?

Click here to refresh your STI knowledge

 

E-cigarettes and Vaping: What You Should Know

E-cigarettes and Vaping: What You Should Know

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What is an e-cigarette?

E-cigarettes are battery-powered devices that allow users to inhale or vape aerosolized liquid (e-juice). There are many different types of e-cigarettes, commonly referred to as “vapes” or hookah pens, e-pipes or Juuls, among others. These products are the most commonly used tobacco product among youth!

So what do you need to know? Nearly all e-cigarettes contain nicotine. Nicotine is highly addictive and can harm the developing adolescent brain. The brain is still developing until about age 25, so when young people are exposed to nicotine it can lead to addiction and disrupt attention and learning. No amount of nicotine is safe for youth. There are hundreds of flavors that can be added to these e-cigarettes to make it “taste” better. The number of flavors is one reason the market for e-cigarettes shifted from helping adults quit smoking to attracting young people to vaping.

In the 2017 Minnesota Youth Tobacco Survey, 19.2% of high school students reported using an e-cigarette within the last 30 days. According to the US Surgeon General, there has been a 900% increase in e-cigarette use by high school students. Recent evidence suggests that, compared to youth who have never used them, youth who have tried e-cigarettes are twice as likely to start smoking in the future.

E-cigarettes are frequently marketed as being a “healthier” option than the traditional cigarette, but this is not true. E-cigarettes have been shown to be just as addictive as traditional cigarettes. The Surgeon General report on e-cigarettes states “the aerosol created by e-cigarettes can contain ingredients that are harmful to the public’s health, including: nicotine; ultrafine particles; flavorings such as diacetyl, a chemical linked to serious lung disease; volatile organic compounds such as benzene, which is found in car exhaust; and heavy metals, such as nickel, tin, and lead.”

So what can we do to keep our young people healthy and not use e-cigarettes? As we say at myHealth, staying well means staying well informed. Knowing what e-cigarettes are, their potential risks, and what they look like are the first steps in helping our young people stay healthy! The Center for Disease Control gives the following tips for chatting with a young person about vaping:

Know the facts.

Be patient and ready to listen.

  • Avoid criticism and encourage an open dialogue.
  • Remember, your goal is to have a conversation, not to deliver a lecture.
  • It’s OK for your conversation to take place over time, in bits and pieces.

Set a positive example by being tobacco-free.

  • If you use tobacco, it’s never too late to quit. For free help, visit smokefree.gov or call 1-800-QUIT-NOW.

 

Check out these great resources for more information on e-cigarettes and young people.

https://www.health.state.mn.us/ecigarettes

http://clearwaymn.org/e-cigarettes/

https://e-cigarettes.surgeongeneral.gov/

Is my relationship healthy?

Healthy Relationships

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It’s February!

With Valentine’s Day in this middle month, February is often called the month of love!

It’s a time to celebrate our appreciation for the loved ones in our life. Did you know February is also Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month? Teen dating violence is more common than one may think. In 2016, 17% of Minnesota 11th graders reported experiencing some form of intimate partner violence, including physical, sexual and verbal (2018 Minnesota Adolescent Sexual Health Report). People ages 16 to 24 experience the highest rate of intimate partner violence, especially women identified folks. These stats are one of the reasons myHealth believes it is so important to talk to young people about healthy relationships.

A question we get a lot at myHealth is “How do I know if my relationship is healthy?” That is a difficult question and there is not always a straight forward answer. Our Youth Advisory Board (YAB) created this Healthy Relationship poster for Valentine’s Day/Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month to help answer this question. The poster highlights some common healthy and unhealthy behaviors. YAB members will be posting this in their schools for young people to see!

For more information, check out myHealth’s tab on Healthy Relationship or visit LoveIsRespect.org.

4.6.20 Mental Health Appointments are Now VirtualNew Updates